THREE STAR AUTO SERVICE, INC.

AAA APPROVED REPAIR & ASE BLUE SEAL CERTIFIED

MOTOR SILK

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MOTOR SILK

 
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Motor Silk™
Engine Surface Treatment -

A Breakthrough in Lubrication

Near Frictionless Surface Coating


The Boron CLS Bond™ chemistry in Motor Silk™ is micron to submicron size - so tiny that particles penetrate into the tightest clearances between metal sliding parts. Once there, the particles are mechanically dispersed and chemically bonded to all metal surfaces in the form of a permanent, yet super-slippery protective boundary layer.
• Reduces friction, lengthens engine life.
Boosts gas mileage, and cuts emissions.
Increases power of engine.
Add to your engine oil in 10:1 dilution.
Lasts the lifetime of the engine.

 

MOTOR SILK

 

Near Frictionless Surface Coating

 


A Breakthrough That's Redefining the Standards For:

 


Unique Molecular Structure Makes the CLS Bond Unrivaled

   The benefits of CLS Bond® products have been documented in test after test. For example, engine friction is reduced by up to 80%, and engine wear by up to 90%.* And in private testing by industrial users, for both engine oils and industrial grease, the results have been even more impressive. Plus, boron is environmentally friendly in all forms.  The bottom line is that lubricants with Boron CLS Bond® can be used anywhere there's a need for guaranteed performance.


 


How Does Our Patented Boron CLS Bond® Technology Work?

Boric acid is introduced to a metallic substrate in the presence of water vapor.  Interaction between the substrate, the water (H2O), and Boric Acid (H3BO3) forms a continuously self-replenishing film of boric oxide (B2O3) that bonds to the substrate, forming a corrosion-resistant barrier.
The boric oxide spontaneously reacts with the air, replenishing the boric acid.  The boric acid molecules form into crystal platelets, each of which is a triclinic lattice of molecules strongly bound together by macromolecular covalent bonds (see microscopic photo at right).
Aligned by the mechanical motion of the substrate, the platelets form stacked layers with very small (0.318 nm) spaces between.  As a result, the inter-platelet layers are bound by weak "van der Waals" forces, allowing a very low coefficient of friction.